Assam floods affecting millions of inhabitants; water supply situation seems uncontrollable. | Potential of India’s water structure scheme estimated at $270Billion. | Around 96% of water consumed in the Hyderabad Metropolitan Development Authority region is ‘virtual’ water, and only 4% is used directly by people. | Union Jal Shakti Minister Gajendra Singh Shekhawat said most of the river water disputes among states were either in courts or in tribunals.

WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT

With both the population of India and its industrial landscape increasing at a phenomenal speed, our environment has already taken a heavy toll .One of the pollutants of environment is wastewater which is actually contaminated water. Two main sources of water contamination are sewerage (domestic/municipal waste) and effluents (i.e.industrial/commercial wastes).

To add to these woes, the freshwater sources such as rivers, wells, groundwater are also depleting. Waste water is not only unfit for consumption, but it also mixes with other water sources and contaminates them as well. Wastewater runs downstream & joins other water sources and the process spreads further. Wastewater also seeps into the ground and affects underground water sources. As a result, almost every water source today is heavily polluted- starting from rivers and wells to sea and coastal areas.

To some extent, nature can deal with few soft contaminants, primarily bio contaminants such as human and animal waste. However, the massive amount of wastewater contributed by industries & human beings in the form of non- biological waste and hard bio contaminants cannot be managed by nature alone.

Thus, management of wastewater has become imperative today.

There are many areas where the need for wastewater management is dire. Some of the areas of operation for wastewater treatment plants in India are:

➤ Municipal water management for towns and cities

➤ For use in rural areas, such as irrigation

➤ Industrial sector

➤ Desalination

➤ Large building societies or colonies

Some of the challenges still faced in India are:

 

➤ Lack of awareness

➤ Lack of public-private partnership on wastewater management

➤ Apathy by some governments

➤ Lack of a cohesive nationwide campaign

➤ Imbalance in the amount of wastewater and treatment plants

Swach is actively following this space and is aligned with the policies & missions of Central & State Govt. in India such as Namami Gange, Swach Bharat Mission , Smart City Mission, Amrut etc.

Swach is looking forward to participate in upcoming projects in collaboration with various technical and strategic partners, both on national and global levels.